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ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 116-120

Veterinary medical students' perspectives on traditional and pass-fail grading models in preclinical training


Department of Clinical Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Kenneth Royal
1060 William Moore Dr, Raleigh 27607, NC
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/EHP.EHP_34_19

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Background: There is current debate about the merits of traditional (e.g., A, B, C…; 4.0, 3.0, 2.0…, etc.,) versus pass-fail (P/F) (e.g., P/F) grading models in medical education. The purpose of this study was to explore veterinary students' perspectives about the pros and cons of traditional and P/F grading approaches. Methods: This study involved a census sample of 3rd and 4th year veterinary medical students at one veterinary college in the United States. Results: Students held widely different opinions about the two popular grading models. Students favoring traditional grading tend to cite reasons such as increased motivations to learn, more precise and accurate measures, improved feedback quality and advantages when applying for internships and residency. Students favoring P/F grading tend to cite reasons such as improved health and wellness, more genuine learning, reduced competition among students, training would better imitate veterinary practice, and P/F grading would overcome problems associated with inaccurate grading. Conclusions: Some students' perceptions about grading are not rooted in research evidence. Thus, this study not only identifies common beliefs about popular grading models, but also identifies potential concerns that policy-makers will have to contend with should institutions elect to revise their grading policies.


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