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ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 91-97

Part II: Observations of clinical teaching in the veterinary teaching hospital


1 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine; Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
2 Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
3 Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA
4 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Candice Stefanou
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/EHP.EHP_19_19

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Background: Clinical education is uniformly considered an essential phase of training in all health professions, yet our understanding of the nature of clinical teaching is limited, including how teaching responsibilities are distributed among various teaching staff available. This study documents variety of teaching techniques used in the clinics of a veterinary teaching hospital and explores the teaching roles that are assumed by the clinical staff. Methods: Nearly 115 h of structured observations of clinical teaching in 11 different clinical services was evaluated. Results: Faculty and residents engaged in different but complementary teaching behaviors with the students. House officers were most likely to demonstrate their clinical reasoning for the students and respond to student questions. Faculty, on the other hand, primarily asked students questions. Providing opportunities for students to observe professionals demonstrating clinical problem-solving and decision-making and questioning and answering questions were the dominant teaching techniques. All teachers took opportunities to extend student learning by taking advantage of the “teaching moment” as the fourth most frequent teaching technique observed. Conclusion: Results suggest that, while a variety of valuable teaching techniques are utilized, there could be more opportunities for students to practice decision-making under the supervision of seasoned professionals.


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